***Remember. If your looking to get started with Sous Vide, or even just add to your gear. Head over to my Getting Started page and follow the links to get your gear today! now on with the cook***

London Broil….

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Ok. ok. I can hear the internet mob forming already. Yes, London broil is not actually the cut of beef. These are top round roasts. But I am going to refer to it as London Broil for this blog. why? Well, because thats what this has always been to me growing up.

After being the beneficiary of a buy one get one free sale, I decided that I was going to cook these two different ways. One in a traditional London broil marinade (Ant Kellys) and the other, only seasoned with salt and pepper.

🔪Prep Time 10 minutes

🛁Sous Vide Time 12 hour @130F/54.5C

👨‍🍳Sear Time 10 min

🥩 Total Time 12 hour  20 minutes

Ingredients (Ant Kellys Marinade)

  • 1⁄4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1⁄4 cup soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1⁄4 cup olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, Crushed
  • 1 teaspoon rosemary
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
  • 2- 2 lb london broil (top round roasts)

Instructions

To keep it in line with the original recipe, I scored the London broil before it went in the marinade. From my research, this is done to sever the tough fibers? Someone fact check me on that? But I decided I would follow the recipe to the letter as I was trying to duplicate a traditional cook in the SV. As I was doing it I wasn’t crazy about it. (Note: I definitely went a lot deeper than I wanted. generally you’re looking for about 1/8″)

Next, combine your marinade ingredients and the beef into your ziploc bags and marinate in the fridge for at least 4 hours and up to overnight. For this cook I went overnight.

For the other roast I kept it simple. Just Salt, pepper, and into the bag it went. Since the marinade was going overnight I decided the only fair way was to salt the other roast and put it in the fridge overnight as well.

When you’re ready to cook your roasts, I took the london broil out of the marinade and put it into another clean ziploc. In place of a nicely vacuum sealed bag, you’re going to want to use the water displacement method which is achieved by submerging the protein in the water till most of the air is out of the bag. Then secure the bags to the side of the Sous Vide Container  with binder clips.

Set my Sous Vide cooker  to 130F/54.5C and place bags in bath for the long cook.

I left these roasts in for 12 hours and when the London broil came out I didn’t have the same warm and fuzzy I usually get from other SV meats I have done.

When I pulled the Salt/pepper one I had a little better feeling. They didnt look that great but I went right to searing.

For searing these roasts, I treated them like steaks. I used a Cast Iron Skillet. Heat up the skillet on medium high and when it just starts smoking add the oil. I then seared for 60 seconds a side.

First up was the London broil and at the first slice, I knew something was up. Right away I could tell it was dryer than I ever thought a SV piece of meat could be. And after tasting it my visual thoughts were confirmed. Dry, and the taste was almost none existent.

I was so perplexed, so the only thing to do was to take a look inside the salt and pepper seasoned top round. This had a much better result. This was juicy and tender. The only interesting thought I had was that it did not look like the inside of a 130 degree SV roast.

Conclusion

So two wildly different results here. Ill start off by saying the salt and peppered roast came out good. What really puzzled me is why the London broil dried out. To be honest, I am not exactly sure. If we look at the variables, the only differences were the scoring and the marinade. My initial thoughts are that the scoring allowed the meat to dry out. What I do know….Im going to need to run this experiment again! If anyone has an idea what may have happened here I would love to hear it. Im open to all suggestions.

If you enjoyed this recipe id love to hear from you! Drop me a line and let me know what you liked or what you didn’t like, your opinion matters to me. As always you can follow this blog from the button below, as well as your favorite social media platform! Follow on Instagram and Facebook @JBSOUSVIDE to be the first to know when I post a new cook and share it with a friend!

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Who doesn’t love fall brunches? Mimosas. Bloody Marys. Brunch Burgers. French toast. All so easy to make that you don’t have to worry about inviting your friends over to cook for them.

Eggs Benedict on the other hand, has always been on a pedestal for me. That unattainable dish I was scared to attempt on a time crunch. Just too much that could go wrong. Well, this Chef Steps recipe tout’d itself as one you couldn’t mess up. So I knew what I had to do. Because if I could do it. You all certainly could!

Remember, If you are looking to get started on your Sous Vide journey, or you just need some more gear for your cooks. Head here: Getting Started


🔪Prep Time 15 minutes

🛁Sous Vide Time 2 hour @147F/64C

🍳 Total Time 2 hours 15 minutes

Ingredients

Hollandaise Sauce

  • 1 shallot
  • 2oz Champagne Vinegar
  • 2oz water
  • 6oz Butter
  • 6 large Egg yolks
  • Juice of a 1/2 Lemon
  • salt to taste

Eggs Benedict

  • 2 English Muffins
  • 4 large eggs
  • Ham or favorite benny meat

Instructions

Dice your shallot and add it to a pot with the Champagne vinegar. Reduce on high heat by half. Strain remaining liquid into Hollandaise bag.

Combine rest of Hollandaise ingredients into your Sous Vide bag of choice. Then take the eggs meant for the Benedict and place them in a bag of their own. (Just keeps them from going around all over the container)

Set your Sous Vide cooker to 147F/64C and place your bags into your Sous Vide Container

Before you pull out your eggs and hollandaise, prep your english muffins. You could use a toaster. but I don’t have one.

So I buttered my english muffins and browned them in a pan.

When you pull your hollandaise it certainly doesn’t look like it. But we’ll take care of that in a min. Add all the contents into a processor.

Blend thoroughly. And your hollandaise is ready. So simple. So delicious.

Now. We assemble. Ham on first.

Crack your SV eggs next.

Cover with Hollandaise. And your Sous Vide Eggs Benedict is ready to wow your friends.

Remember. Be generous with those portions! You like the people you invited over after all right? Right?!

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Conclusion

Insanely Good. Thats it. No other way to say it. I was floored by how good this came out, versus how simple it was to make. I didn’t even break a sweat. I highly recommend giving this one a go. If I can do it, you can certainly knock this one out of the park!

If you enjoyed this recipe id love to hear from you! Drop me a line and let me know what you liked or what you didn’t like, your opinion matters to me. As always you can follow this blog from the button below, as well as your favorite social media platform! Follow on Instagram and Facebook @JBSOUSVIDE to be the first to know when I post a new cook and share it with a friend!

Its that time of year. Thanksgiving is coming. Big Bird Day. Turkey Day. (T-Day, if you will). Imagine this, you’ve gotten a Sous Vide this year, you’ve had a lot of success with most of the stuff you’ve tried. Now you’re getting reallllly cocky. You want to make the big bird in the SV.

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Im here to be your guinea pig. I set out to make a mock Thanksgiving turkey ahead of the big day. And heres how it went. Since I have never attempted turkey in the SV, I followed some great advice on the Anova facebook group. I decided to follow the Chef Steps recipe for Legs and the Kenji Lopez recipe for breasts.

Remember, If you are looking to get started on your Sous Vide journey, or you just need some more gear for your cooks. Head here: Getting Started


🔪Prep Time 10 minutes

🛁Sous Vide Time Legs/Thighs 24 hours @149F/65C

🛁 Sous Vide Time Breast 3 hours @145F/62.7C

Broil Time: 10 Min

🎂 Total Time 24 hour 10 min

Ingredients

Legs/Thighs

  • 2 Turkey Legs w/ Thighs (Skin On)
  • Salt
  • Sugar
  • Olive Oil
  • Aromatics of choice

Breasts

  • 1 Large Turkey Breast (Skin On)
  • Salt
  • Fresh Ground Pepper

Instructions

For this experiment I decided to get all the relevant Turkey pieces to try.

To start, I took my legs and thighs and gave them a light pre-sear on the skin. Heated a heavy bottom Cast Iron Skillet over medium high heat and add a high smoke point oil. Seared till golden.

So more big news on the blog, JB Sous Vide finally has a vacuum sealer. Ill be running this one through its paces and then do a review.

Take your turkey legs and seal.

Set your Sous Vide cooker to 149F/65C and place your pouches into your Sous Vide Container

At hour 9 into the Legs cook I took to prepping my turkey breast so it had time to absorb the salt.

First remove the skin and set aside. As per the recipe we’re crisping that separately.

Season the turkey generously and seal. I set my breast in the fridge to rest for 12 hours.

At hour 21 of the leg cook, I dropped the temperature of the water bath to 145F/62.7C and set the breast in for a 3 hour cook. I left the legs and thighs in to finish its 24hrs out.

To work on the skin, pre-heat your oven to 400 degrees. You’re going to take a shallow sheet pan lined with parchment. (I used a pyrex here. do as kenji says, not as I do). Spread the skin over the first layer of parchment.

Cover with a second layer of parchment and press out the air with your hands. Set another sheet pan on top and place in the over. Roast the skin for about 30-45 min.

After 24 hours cooking the legs and 3hrs for the breast, its time to get to searing. Remove the pieces from the bath and pat dry with paper towels. Right now it doesn’t look that appetizing, but we’ll take care of that in a minute.

Place the leg pieces on a rack over a sheet and pre heat your broiler to as high as you can get it. Broil the legs for between 5-15 min. Keep an eye on them to avoid burning.

Slice up your Turkey breast and serve with you favorite T-Day sides and enjoy!

Conclusion

Ok, ok, I know what you’re thinking. How did it taste? Well, I would say it was an OK representation of turkey for me. The star of the show was without a doubt the legs/thighs. They were so tender and juicy. So much flavor. I would do that again. The breast was not my favorite. I just didn’t enjoy the texture it gave me. I will have to do some tweaking there to see if I can get to something I love.

Now, would I sous vide a whole turkey for your Thanksgiving? No, I don’t think I would. At this point in time at least. I think if i were going to do it, I would make a Turkey roulade but after this experiment I would still lean towards the traditional roast turkey method. Just me. Whatever you do though. Practice it before the big day. Do not. I repeat, do not! wing it. Looking at you Mary.

If you enjoyed this recipe id love to hear from you! Drop me a line and let me know what you liked or what you didn’t like, your opinion matters to me. As always you can follow this blog from the button below, as well as your favorite social media platform! Follow on Instagram and Facebook @JBSOUSVIDE to be the first to know when I post a new cook and share it with a friend!

Sweaters, hayrides, turkey, fireplaces, apple picking and Pumpkin Pie. Those things just seem to go with fall and boy, do I have a hankerin for some fall. Heading into the holiday season I decided to dive into the dessert realm again and see if it just as easy as Chef Steps makes it look. If I can just get desserts down it’ll be a great winter!

Remember, If you are looking to get started on your Sous Vide journey, or you just need some more gear for your cooks. Head here: Getting Started


🔪Prep Time 15 minutes

🛁Sous Vide Time 1 hour @185F/85C

🎂 Total Time 1 hour 15 min

Ingredients

  • 16oz Pumpkin Puree
  • 2g Salt
  • 0.5g Ground Allspice
  • 0.5g Nutmeg
  • 0.5g Ground Cinnamon
  • 165g Sugar
  • 0.5g Ground Cloves
  • 1g Ground Ginger
  • 2 Large Eggs
  • 12oz Evaporated Milk

Additional Equipment:

  • Hand Mixer
  • Mason Jars (I used the 4oz jars here)

Instructions

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Start out by combining all your dry ingredients into a bowl. In this cook I used a hand mixer to blend together but a food processor will also work.

Once the ingredients are mixed well, add in your eggs and combine again.

Next, add in your evaporated milk, and you guessed it, combine once more till everything is well blended.

At this point you have a decision to make. If you would like a silky smooth pumpkin pin you can now run the mixture through a strainer. I did not have a strainer big enough so I left it as is. I think it turned out just fine without. After making this decision, fill your mason jars up leaving a little space up top. Seal the jars fingertip tight. You don’t want the lid on very tight or the air wont be able to escape and the jars could crack.

Set your Sous Vide cooker to 185F/85C and place mason jars in the bath for 1 hour.

After an hour, transfer the jars to the fridge and let chill throughly. When ready to serve, garnish with your favorite crumbly topping and a dollop of whipped cream and enjoy your Pumpkin Pie.

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Conclusion

Yup, just as easy as it looks. And just as delicious. Im not much of a baker but having success with these desserts in the Sous Vide really makes me confident going into the Holiday season. With this and the cheesecake recipe from earlier this year I have no doubt I could put together large stunning dinner parties. That was certainly not the case before I got my SV. Go try this, and tag me in your cooks on social media! Id love to see how yours came out!

If you enjoyed this recipe id love to hear from you! Drop me a line and let me know what you liked or what you didn’t like, your opinion matters to me. As always you can follow this blog from the button below, as well as your favorite social media platform! Follow on Instagram and Facebook @JBSOUSVIDE to be the first to know when I post a new cook and share it with a friend!

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You deserve it. Pork Belly is a guilty pleasure and is just one of those meals where flavor is bursting in every bite. I first saw this recipe by Kenji Lopez over on Serious Eats and just had to give it a try. You can also do this cook with the traditional bao buns but I have found that the slider gives you more real estate to build a good bite. Note: This is a great cook to put on before you go to bed, and take out when you wake up in the morning. Just throw the bag and the contents into the fridge until you’re ready to cook.

🔪Prep Time 5 minutes

🛁Sous Vide Time 10 hour @170F/76.7C

👨‍🍳Broiling Time 3-5 min

🐷 Total Time 10 hour 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2lb Pork Belly
  • 1/2 Cup Soy Sauce
  • 1/2 Cup Mirin
  • 1/2 Cup sugar
  • 2 tbsp fish sauce
  • 2 scallions chopped
  • 3 cloves crushed garlic
  • 1 tbsp ground ginger
  • 2/3 cup mayo
  • Your Favorite Slaw
  • Hawaiian Slider Rolls (or slider rolls of your choice

Instructions

Pour Soy, Mirin, Sugar, fish sauce, scallions, garlic, ginger into a bowl and combine.

Add braising liquid and pork belly to your bag. Im using the gallon size ziploc type bags.

Set your Sous Vide cooker to 170F/76.7C and place bags in bath.

In place of a nicely vacuum sealed bag, you’re going to want to use the water displacement method which is achieved by submerging the protein in the water till most of the air is out of the bag. The pork belly wanted to float so I pressed the sous vide up against it. Then secure the bags to the side of the Sous Vide Container with binder clips.

As I mentioned earlier, I like to put this cook on right before I go to bed and when I wake up its already done. From here, I will usually ice bath right away, and then throw the whole bag into the fridge till I am ready. With all that time you can get your sides ready. This time I made a nice slaw to top the sliders with.

When that time comes I take the pork belly out of the bag and transfer about 1/2 the liquid to a pan and begin to heat it up. After it warms up a bit, strain out all the solids and transfer the liquid back to the pan. You’re going to reduce this to a loose syrup. Kenji says about 15 min. I took it a little slower here, as I have a tendency to burn sauces. After you get a syrup like consistency, add about 2 tbsp of the syrup to the mayo and you have yourself a flavor bomb of a condiment.

For the belly itself, take and cut it like so. about 2″ strips and 1/3″ slices.

Right now they don’t look that appetizing but we’ll take care of that in a minute. We’re going to use the broiler for this cook. Crank that puppy up as high as she’ll go. These went in at 525 for about 5 min.

Take this time to prep your rolls. I decided to butter and toast them in the pan.

Now the fun part. The best thing about sliders is building them any way you want. This time, I kept it very simple. The braising sauce mayo and a light slaw. So good.

Conclusion

I was extremely happy with how these sliders came out (as was everyone else). I think the slaw worked well. I also think a more traditional set of toppings would be very good. Little cucumber, onion, cilantro? mmmm. Not much I would change with this one. Im def going to start incorporating more slider cooks in. They are so versatile.

If you enjoyed this recipe id love to hear from you! Drop me a line and let me know what you liked or what you didn’t like, your opinion matters to me. As always you can follow this blog from the button below, as well as your favorite social media platform! Follow on Instagram and Facebook @JBSOUSVIDE to be the first to know when I post a new cook and share it with a friend!